Tropical Storm Calvin lashes popular tourist spots in Southern Mexico

September 3, 2017
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Tropical Storm Calvin weakened as it slogged across southeastern Mexico Tuesday, its rains and high winds lashing a stretch of coast dotted with tourist beach towns.

The storm, now back to tropical depression status, was centered about 45 miles (70 kilometers) north-northeast of Puerto Angel and it was moving west-northwest at 6 mph (9 kph), according to the U.S. National Hurricane Center. It had maximum sustained winds of 30 mph (45 kph) 40 mph (65 kph) and additional weakening was expected as it moves across land.

Forecasters said Calvin is expected to dump 6 to 12 inches (150 to 300 millimeters) of rain across Oaxaca, Guerrero and Chiapas states, with higher isolated accumulations possible, threatening landslides and flash floods.

Oaxaca state closed schools on Monday due to potential flooding.

Tropical Storm Beatriz soaked the same area with torrential rains in early June.

Calvin is the third tropical storm of the eastern Pacific season, which began May 15.

Latest Advisory:
At 400 AM CDT (0900 UTC), the center of Tropical Depression Calvin
was located near latitude 16.3 North, longitude 96.3 West. The
depression is moving toward the west-northwest near 6 mph (9 km/h)
and this motion is expected to continue today. On the forecast
track, the center of Calvin will continue to move inland over
southeastern Mexico today.



Maximum sustained winds have decreased to near 30 mph (45 km/h)
with higher gusts. Additional weakening is forecast, and Calvin is
expected to dissipate over the mountainous terrain of southern
Mexico later today.

The estimated minimum central pressure is 1007 mb (29.74 inches).

HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND
———————-
RAINFALL: Calvin is expected to produce total rain accumulations
of 6 to 12 inches across the Mexican states of Chiapas, Oaxaca,
Guerrero, and Veracruz, with possible isolated maximum amounts
of 20 inches. Calvin is also forecast to produce total rain
accumulations of 3 to 6 inches in the Mexican states of Tabasco,
Morelos, Mexico, and Michoaca, as well as in Guatemala. These
rains are expected to produce life-threatening flash floods
and mudslides.