Volkswagen’s New NMC To Be Built In Mexico

At the Beijing Motor Show, a lot of the talk surrounded the Golf R400 Concept based on the Golf R hatchback, but there was another reveal named the New Midsize Coupe (NMC) Concept that didn’t play second fiddle. Fast-forward a week later and we are now hearing reports from Automotive News that the NMC will be bound for production as soon as 2016.

Currently, we don’t know what the NMC’s production name will be, but it’s expected to use the new MQB platform and will be based on the next-generation Jetta. During its reveal, we were told that the concept was powered by a 2.0-litre turbo four-cylinder engine good for 217 horsepower and mated to your choice of a dual-clutch or manual transmission. That engine under certain conditions can go from 0-100 km/h in 6.5 seconds and reach a top speed of 243 km/h.

Once in production and on the Volkswagen roster, the NMC will sit in-between the Jetta and Passat. It will be a sporty four-door coupe that’s shorter than the Jetta, but wider than the Passat. Many auto pundits are expecting the NMC to challenge the CLA-Class from Mercedes-Benz.

Can Volkswagen compete with their German brethren? Only time will tell, as who knows what the auto industry landscape will look like by 2016. Will Volkswagen be able to lower the cost of the NMC to a point where consumers will choose a Volkswagen over a Benz? Only time will tell.

As with many concepts, certain things will be scrapped and that will definitely include the boomerang tail lamps, 20-inch wheels and white leather seats with cross-stitching.

The Volkswagen NMC showcases some modernized styling that’s sorely needed to revitalize the once exciting German brand.

The NMC is expected to be built in Pueblo, Mexico where the Jetta and Golf are currently produced.

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