PROFECO puerto vallarta

PROFECO suspends 25 businesses in Puerto Vallarta

The Jalisco Department of the Federal Consumer Protection Agency (Profeco) today reported that 25 businesses in Puerto Vallarta have been suspended for failing to comply with consumer laws.

In a statement the delegate of the state’s PROFECO, Gabriela Vazquez Flores, said the unit started operating in order to verify good business practices and prevent consumers from being abused by businesses in the tourism sector over the holidays.

“At the moment we have performed 50 visits to travel agencies, hotels, timeshares, airlines, trucking lines, restaurants, bars, car rental companies, cinemas, supermarkets and clothing retailers, of which 25 were suspended for irregularities,” the agency said.

How to file a complaint with Mexico’s consumer protection agency (PROFECO)

The reasons for the suspensions were for not displaying prices, not providing sales receipts, displaying prices in foreign currency, and advertise that misleads or intends to cause confusion with consumers.

The penalties range from $462 pesos to $3,800,000 pesos, depending on the economic condition of the establishment, intentional and gravity of the offense.

Businesses have an opportunity to correct violations and resume business.

Two service offices for PROFECO for consumer complaints were established during the holidays located on Paseo Marina Vallarta and the Central Bus Station of Puerto Vallarta, in addition to the permanent office located in Francisco Villa # 900.

58 Responses
  1. All items should be on menu and the shameful strategies to propose you other things on “special” when most of the time the only special is the exaggerated price should be banished.
    It very easy to print a daily menu only then you have to show the price….

    1. PROFECO oversees business operations to protect the consumer, just as business managers oversee their employees. If you do something wrong at work, intentional or not, your supervisor will reprimand you in private. If you do not correct the issue you are terminated and the announcement is made that ‘Joe’ is no longer with the company. Businesses can be in violation for one item not being priced, even if a customer removed the price tag. It wouldn’t be a fair system to publicly shame a business because of the desire for street gossip if the business made an honest mistake. Names are released only if the business has repeated violations or refuses to comply with the current violation, then they are closed permanently.

  2. ironseller

    Real Estate in US$ in Mexico? What a sucker play for everyone who is not American perpetrated by realtors. The US dollar is currently inflated about 40% to its true value – a manipulated process. No one can explain to me how an artificially inflated US dollar can drive the cost of Mexican real estate up by 40%. Surprisingly (or not) this US dollar pricing is only in a few locations frequented by foreigners. It is not a practice in larger part of Mexico. Car rental agencies gouge using US dollars. I just refuse to do any business with businesses here pricing in US dollars and I’ll go without before I yield to this horrible practice.

    1. Mark Schneider

      You are an idiot. Regardless of what you think about the USD, the relationship of the USD to any currency floats. An apartment that rents in Puerto Vallarta for $1000 USD is approx. $1400 CAD, `$17500 pesos or God only knows how many yen. Doesn’t matter. If the price is too high, rent something else.

      The only reason prices (for real estate) are listed in USD is that the peso is expected to devalue relative to the USD in the coming year. If you owned a condo in PV, would you rent it for $100 USD per month or $17,000 pesos per month? If you said $1000 USD … go to the head of the line. When the peso hits 20 per USD 6 months from now, would you rather have the renter deposit $1000 USD into your account or $17,000 pesos.

      You must be Canadian.

      1. Please keep arguments on an educated adult level without name calling. There is no reason for those kinds of attacks because someone’s opinion doesn’t match yours. Also, real estate has been priced in USD for 2 decades or longer in Puerto Vallarta, so it has nothing to do with a recent fear of a devaluation. It’s because Americans want the money paid in USD to their USD bank so they can avoid taxes, and they prefer to rent to foreigners because they don’t like renting to Mexican Nationals. That’s just a fact.

        1. Mark Schneider

          Since this is Mexico, ALL LANDLORDS are required to accept pesos as payment. That is a FACT. I believe that a landlord can be reported to PROFECO for not accepting pesos … but I am not sure.

          1. Siege

            I have lived in Mexico for 23 years. I have rented, owned and built a custom home during this time. Up front, the international ACCEPTED currency is the US dollar and for good reason – it is the most stable. Mexico’s currency is fragile and has been devaluing steadily for the past decade. Yes, I was living in Mexico when the major devaluation happened resulting in brand new currency. The US dollar is the standard in Mexico. Landlords perhaps may be required to accept payment in pesos but the agreed rate is what counts. Therefore, an example will be the rent is $1,000 usd per month, or the equivalent in pesos as set by bank @ close of business the day before it is due. I worked and was paid in pesos based on US dollar rate, when I got paid, I converted the pesos back into dollars, took a little hit on the conversion fee, but I was able to basically protect my dollar at that rate, otherwise I would have lost thousands of dollars over the years. It’s just the way it is done in Mexico and pretty much other countries around the world.

        2. Pegeen White

          Yes, because they have invested US dollars and benefited from slave labor building their dreams. Sleep well in your luxury condo knowing really poor people built it,are paid pittance to maintain it to your standards, and go home and sell their own paltry crap to make it through the summer. And the builder or owner you rent it from gets rich on the Mexican’s impoverished children’s backs. And feels proud he is such a good investor. Disgusting, really, but nobody talks about it.

      2. Uzarate

        “The only reason prices (for real estate) are listed in USD is that the peso is expected to devalue relative to the USD in the coming year.” Sorry, but you’re wrong and I’m not sure where you’re getting your economic projections from. Real estate in PV has been listed in USD for decades and has absolutely nothing to do with the expectation of a lower value for the peso. It has more to do with the fact that the real estate market in PV is geared predominantly towards foreigners. Oh, sorry but the peso will absolutely NOT “hit” 20 per USD in six months. You need to read up a little more on what determines fluctuations in currency values and the role of the central bank (Banco de Mexico) in stabilizing them.

        1. Mark Schneider

          I have seen several projections saying that the peso will devalue to 20:1 to the USD. I personally do not believe it but I have read it.

          In any case, landlords are REQUIRED to accept pesos as payment. And it really doesn’t matter HOW they price their property. As of today, $1000 USD = $1400 CAD (approx) = $17,000 pesos.

          The ONLY difference is that if the rent payment is STATED in USD, then you might pay $17,000 pesos this month, $17,500 next month, $16,700 the month after, etc. depending upon the USD to peso conversion.

          Anyone’s best option is to negotiate with the landlord a “fixed rent” in pesos

          1. SMM

            Legally speaking, if you sign a rental agreement for six months with a cost per month of 1,000 dollars, the cost per month in pesos is dollar-peso exchange rate at the close of the following day. That set peso price per month is the “legal peso price” for the duration of the agreement. It is not supposed to float along with the exchange rate.

          2. ironseller

            “I have seen….” Oh ya!!! The huge American uncontrollable debt will take it’s toll. The day of US bankers having a field day manipulating world currencies will soon be over. American, Canadian or who ever. There’s some good money made just playing the manipulation strategies used to control the US dollar. Definitely not a long term play but good for quick in and out.

          3. Uzarate

            You don’t even know the meaning of the term “devalue” sir. Devalue means to intentionally lower the value of a currency when there is an official exchange rate. The Mexican peso is not pegged at any official value by the Banco de Mexico sir…it floats freely on the exchange market. I’m done. Come back when you’ve had at least a semester of economics 101.

  3. Pricing in US dollars annoys me. Uh, people from other countries travel to Mexico. I don’t carry USD, I’m not an American. My friends from Germany, when there, where confused. They spent time understanding pesos, and conversion from their currency. When they saw prices in USD, they easily got taken in the beginning.

  4. Not sure why everyone would think that it’s such a terrible crime to have something marked in US dollars?
    I’m not sure who Profeco serves the consumers or themselves? My only example of who they serve would suggest they are corrupt and are only another level of government collecting money for the government!
    A business man I won’t say who or where was fined more than 100,000 pesos for selling one item not listed on his menu!
    Was basically told to shut and pay or there would be more to come.
    Seems a ridiculous fine for an innocent mistake.

    1. It’s not a crime to mark items with US prices, as long as you mark them with pesos too. Obviously it wouldn’t be fair to Mexicans working for pesos to be expected to pay in US dollars, the law is to protect the Mexican people. Also, you can go to any restaurant and ask them to make you something special that isn’t on the menu and that isn’t a crime, there is more to the story than you have been told :D

      1. Pegeen White

        The law is there to APPEAR to protect the Mexican people. If it’s in USD, only Mexican drug dealers can afford it. The people can’t.

    2. Iris Merritt

      Well, I hope the duty free at the airport is looked at. I asked the price of an unmarked bottle of grand marnier and was told it was $28. I asked how much in peso’s as I wanted to pay cash in peso’s and was told “we don’t deal in Peso”. When I asked to see a manager, I was told the same thing. I was shocked!

      1. Pegeen White

        You have no idea how many ways you are being used to profit the already rich and keep down the poor when you are in Mexico. You think you deserve a fair transaction for Grand Marnier. That is the surface of a really deep problem, of affluent people only thinking about what they want, know they deserve, and lots of poor people wiping the floor you walk on for US pennies.

    3. SMM

      I think it’s a terrible crime because I live in Mexico and earn pesos, not dollars. The big problem is the prices are set in USD and then converted to MXN. So, over the last year, these prices have gone up 40%, while my peso income has not gone up 40%.

      1. Steve Knight

        Bang on! It continues to baffle me why Mexico allows the US dollar to keep their economy in chaos. Your a big country-stand up for yourself. For tourists: you are in Mexico and Mexico’s currency is the peso, not the over-inflated US dollar. Have some respect people. When in Mexico, get yourself some pesos! And PV: get rid of those USD-dispensing ATMs littering the city.

  5. A note of clarification. It’s not illegal to offer prices in US dollars or any other currency, but it is illegal to not display a cost in pesos. The businesses fined for currency violations were pricing items exclusively in foreign currency and not having a visible cost in pesos available to the consumer.

    1. Pegeen White

      The law is there to APPEAR to protect the Mexican people. If it’s in USD, only Mexican drug dealers can afford it. The people can’t. No honest Mexican would pay what you are paying for real estate, or even dinner. But lots of honest Mexicans work to build and clean your real estate and you can be sure they are paid in pesos. And you can be sure they are getting a completely ridiculously low portion of what you are paying the fat cats who built your place. It is gringo to gringo money and those gringos who own are smiling .all the way to the bank because so little of what they get goes to the people who have created your dream with no gloves on their hands or masks on their faces, or recourse of any kind if a brick falls on their head or they are crippled in a work accident.

  6. I noted to Soriana that their price for medicine was higher than the officially allowed high price stamped on the package, — got no response– needed it, so I bought it. I miss the real pharmacist they used to employ.

    1. It’s an issue of ONLY displaying dollars. It’s not really to protect foreigners, it’s because it’s unfair to expect the Mexican people to be told the cost of something not in their currency. They MUST display prices in Pesos, not exclusively in a foreign currency. Like real estate.. how can they get away with pricing all real estate in dollars?

      1. Pegeen White

        The law is there to APPEAR to protect the Mexican people. If it’s in USD, only Mexican drug dealers can afford it. The people can’t. No honest Mexican would pay what you are paying for real estate. But lots of honest Mexicans work to build and clean your real estate and you can be sure they are paid in pesos. And you can be sure they are getting a completely ridiculously low portion of what you are paying the fat cats who built your place. It is gringo to gringo money and those gringos who own are smiling .all the way to the bank because so little of what they get goes to the people who have created your dream with no gloves on their hands or masks on their faces, or recourse of any kind if a brick falls on their head or they are crippled in a work accident.

    1. PROFECO does not release business names of suspensions. Businesses are given the opportunity to correct their violations. PROFECO oversees business practices just like a business manager oversees their employees. Business managers do not announce every time an employee has been reprimanded, it’s a private issue and is only made public if the business does not correct their violations.

  7. Valdimar Huerta

    Wonderfull I hope they put an end to foreign currency adds and exceptance it can’t happen soon enough

  8. I wish this would happen in Cabo San Lucas. Several times I have gone to restaurants there that will only advertise or tell me their prices in $US. Since I am not American, nor am I in the USA when I’m in Cabo, I want prices in pesos. I now won’t eat at a place if they won’t tell me their prices in pesos.

    1. That’s illegal and there was a big article in the gringo gazette about with a phone to and report them . They give it in pesos 1st then US dollars


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