uber puerto vallarta

Puerto Vallarta UBER drivers file complaint with Human Rights Commission

On September 17, UBER drivers in Puerto Vallarta filed a complaint with the Jalisco State Human Rights Commission. A driver agreed to discuss the matter but asked that his name or photo not be released out of fear of reprisal.

“We want to present the following complaint to the Jalisco State Human Rights Commission (CEDHJ), the reason is to expose the constant attacks against the drivers of the UBER platform, the SEMOV (Secretariat of Mobility) uses methods such as hidden, visible and hunting operations in coordination with taxi drivers who call the service to identify UBER drivers, who are then harassed and delivered to authorities and arrested. ”

He added, “this type of harassment prevents us from working and sustain ourselves to live, affecting both the individuals of the platform and in addition to those who use the transport service through the platform”.

“Such arrests violate our guarantees to honest work that safeguards and guarantees Article 5 of the Political Constitution of the United Mexican States, imposing fines with a value greater than $6,000 pesos. additionally the cars are impounded without cause, finally, they force us to travel to the city of Guadalajara to the offices of the Secretary of Mobility (SEMOV) to process the release letter.”

He added that before their cars are returned they are forced to sign letters – “In short, the document we are forced to sign states that the vehicle will no longer be used for the use of the UBER platform, otherwise it will become property of the state, adding that said document does not have signatures, seals, verifications that guarantee that this document has some validity “. He also stressed that “if we refuse to sign the document, the cars are not returned.”

The complaint presented by the drivers of UBER was signed by at least 25 members of the more than 2000, that according to the platform are registered in Puerto Vallarta.

“On repeated occasions we have been told that the UBER platform does have the needed permission to work in the municipality of Puerto Vallarta, ignoring the protection presented by the directors of UBER México with incident number 1537/2018 and which has a final judgment that shows the permit is granted. The agreement stipulates that UBER Mexico pays 1.5% to the State Government for operations.”

The complaint was delivered on behalf of the partners and drivers of UBER to the Jalisco State Human Rights Commission (CEDHJ) waiting for the dissolution and support by the mediating authorities to continue with their right to work.

These tactics have been taking place since a year ago when the platform began to be used more frequently.


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